Huntington Gardens: part 4

Huntington Gardens: part 4

Why yes, there is more. Tons more. And we didn’t even make through all the gardens. It reminds of when my Art History teacher recounted living in Paris. It got to a point, he said, where he’d think, Ho Hum, another wondrous cathedral, and then waltz past with a baguette slung across his shoulder. “It was like trying to eat a whole cheesecake.”

Yep. Huntington’s Desert Garden is wondrous–but I wouldn’t want to try and eat it in one sitting.

That trunk is groovy.

Isn’t it familiar looking, and yet.

And this lovely scenario.

Part sun. Part shade. Those were the light conditions.

I can’t remember if I saw the individual plants first, or the field of Puyas. Overwhelming I tell you.

Puya venusta, a field of super spiny.

My husband found a fellow photographer with his same lens. Excitement ensued.

Puya venusta with men discussing camera lenses.

The blooms are something.

Puya venusta blooms.

Nestled next to more fantastical plants.

Puya venusta and companion plantings.

Here’s Bill, getting back to plant stalking–camera at the ready.

Bill, with Justin to the right, unknown gent to the left–and Megan at lead.

And look at this crazy thing. The sign says “Cereus horribarbus” the internets says it’s actually Cereus hildmannianus subsp. uruguayanus ‘Monstrosus’.

Cereus hildmannianus subsp. uruguayanus ‘Monstrosus’ or so says the internets.

 

Here it is mingling with Yucca brevifolia or another Yucca?

I don’t see Joshua Trees often enough to know for sure about the one above.

Such extraordinary plants exist. Qu’est-ce que c’est? The big tree. Late breaking: Megan identifies as Dracaena draco!

It looks Yucca-ish to me as well.

Beaucarnea recurvata (?)

When I look at this plant, I think Fraggle Rock, which I later realized I’d co-opted from one of Megan’s early posts at Nestmaker. Still apt though, don’t you think?

I can’t remember if this is the same tree from a different angle, or an entirely different tree. This one is clearly marked Beaucarnea recurvata.

Well, clearly marked if you stand on one foot, lean sideways, and have good eyesight.

Some signs were smaller than others.

 

I’ll let you go now. I’ve been dying to read other blog posts on Huntington Gardens, but I’ve been holding off to avoid plagiarizing–the Fraggle’s quip notwithstanding.

Ms. Chief Creator of plant lust her ownself, Megan.

Au revoir

  • Tim Vojt

    More desert gorgeousness. Love love love the Puya and those flowers. Magnificent.
    Looking at that Pachypodium trunk, I’m wishing that all of my trees and plants were covering in spines to resist and impale the furry devils that cause so much destruction in the garden!
    Thanks for continuing to share your visit!

  • I’m pretty sure that tree is Dracaena draco

  • Evan

    That would be hard to swallow in one sitting. Especially with all the spines. Thanks for the great tour! Heh, camera geeks are almost my second people. Plant geeks, of course, are my people first and foremost.