Groundcover spree

Groundcover spree

This weekend I felt like a high roller. Picture less Vegas vacation, diamonds, cars and rolling around on piles of cash. More rolling around on piles of groundcovers and you’ve got the idea. We’re among gardeners here. You guys get it. Thanks to Tamara of Chickadee Gardens, a bunch of garden bloggers were invited out to ogle, photograph, and shop the 50+ wholesale sized greenhouses at Little Prince of Oregon. I had to pinch myself, because this was my very dream for this spring. I’m on a groundcover blitz, as part of my speed gardening strategy to recover from last year’s puppy devastation out there. There may be no better place to fulfill this mission. Little Prince has a HUGE collection of (dog) foot traffic friendly groundcovers, and I was checking things off my wish list left and right. Of course you always remember the one that got away. The plant shown up top is to die for, right? It’s killing me. It was flagged for another customer, so I am without. At least I got to pet its soft foliage briefly. Be on the lookout for Selaginella kraussiana ‘Brownii’. Luckily there were plenty of wish-listers that were not spoken for. Inexplicably, I let one get away completely without a fight. The Scleranthus uniflorus I was dying for when I saw it on Danger Garden? The tag said it needs sharp drainage, which, if I’m being honest, is hard to come by in my garden. So I made Patricia buy three. She has the rock wall to make it happen, and I can always visit and live vicariously. Now...
A few good moss imposters

A few good moss imposters

Tell me I’m not alone. Now that it’s all moist and mossy out there, I frequently see moss that stops me in my tracks. There are just so many strange-good variations. I’m pretty sure people think I’m nuts, stooped and closely examining a rock or a spot of bark dust in a parking lot. “But this moss is different from the other moss, and I need to see what it feels like” I want to explain. But either I still look crazy, or I’m talking to a fellow crazy plant person, in which case they already understand. Some moss is soft and golden and feathery, and you can’t help but run your fingers through it. Some moss is sprouting what look like tiny spiky conifers. Some moss (or lichen?) is coarse and papery and looks like it has fallen from the trees.  It was firmly planted, I checked. Some patches of moss serve as placemats for snacking birds. Some mosses appear to be growing their own mosses. Moss on moss. Some mosses are growing their own Mexican Feather Grass. Some look like they’re part of a tide pool scene with sedums and sempervivums for sea anemones. And others look like alien life forms. But mostly moss is fleeting and comes and goes at will, rarely tamed by gardeners. Because we always want what we can’t have, I get very excited when I find plants that mimic moss. I have a new plant crush. Must have Bolax gummifera, which I’m currently unable to find, making me want it even more. It’s hardy to zone 6a so there’s no reason not to give...