my kingdom for a tree, or two…

my kingdom for a tree, or two…

Do you count losses from pesky winter weather as opportunity? That’s the path I’m taking. This small tree/large shrub for instance. Do you think it’s a sign that I can never remember its name? Oleander? No, that’s not right. It has Rosemary-like foliage. It’s from New Zealand, and I bought it at Xera Nursery. I transplanted it from my Alameda garden. But I have a devil of a time remembering the genus. This poor plant was almost out of the ground after the snow and wind and ice. Now as I look at the picture, I see traces of green. Maybe it would have recovered. It was fine, but no love affair here. And there are so many other good contenders. By all means, register your opinions. This tree has been talking to me for a while. It would be lovely in the back fence garden. That’s where the un-named tree met its demise, right there beside the Fatsia japonica. That other spindly plant still there. Hmmm. I thinks it’s a Pacific Northwest native that I’ve moved several times. Red Flowering Currant, maybe. Poor thing. I need to find it a permanent location, or… Right now it looks like there’s plenty of space in the beds, but you know how it goes. But back to the Fringe Tree. Look at those silky flowers, and fruit for the birdies in the fall. Oh my. Another large shrub or small tree that’s been on my lust list is Heptacodium miconioides aka Seven Son Flower. I saw this tree at Treephoria–a boutique tree nursery in Boring, Oregon–and was smitten at first sight. It has year-round interest–textured dark foliage, fragrant...
Happy New Year 2017

Happy New Year 2017

As you may know, the garden is in a bit of disarray. So instead of plant pictures, we’re sending along photos of some fine-feathered friends. This morning just as Bill and I headed out for a winter walk, I got the bright idea we should go look for herons to photograph. So we jumped in the car and drove five minutes to Whittaker Ponds, where bird life is generally abundant. Today, not so much. We saw quite a few ducks and geese, but they were way out in the middle–too distant for decent shot. And then as we were driving home, I espied a Great Blue Heron in a tree, right by chance, where I’d espied one a couple weeks earlier. A quick U-turn later, we were back on the trail. We crept stealthily toward the bird. Ah hah! The following pictures compliments of Bill Wagenblatt. Feeling as if we’d already had the best of luck, we hopped in the car and turned toward home, again. And THEN we saw a big white bird, the Great Egret, sitting in another tree, close to where we’d managed to scare away the first one. The photographer with the big lens over yonder. (Bill usually photographs vintage race cars, but he’s ever the good sport.) And then, grumpy Egret. I think he saw us and did not find us amusing. A little bit closer. Such stealth we employed to sneak up on this one, to his ever-growing chagrin. I gather when they shift from standing on one foot to standing on both, viewing time is becoming limited. But lucky us. Captured in flight. Coooool. Wishing you a wonderful new year, full...